Rights managed photography pricing examplesIn my last article, Why do Royalty Free (RF) images look like a bargain and why do Rights Managed (RM) images seem much more expensive? What is the difference? I summarised that using RF images could compromise your brand identity if used incorrectly and that RM licensing provided the better, all-round favourable and better value solution. To further the last article I wanted to highlight a couple of examples of RM pricing, with both scenarios using the same image, but having differing usages.

The first scenario is for a local newspaper, needing an small eighth page sized image to illustrate an article. The print run of this regional newspaper would be up to 10,000. You can see the process of choosing the correct usage, print run, location and other variables that need to be entered for it to automatically calculate the price.

Example of editorial rights managed licensing prices
Editorial licensing pricing example rights managed
Editorial licensing pricing example rights managed

The second scenario is for a national advertising campaign in a traditional printed glossy magazine, the image to be used as a quarter page advert, the magazine having a print run of 250,000 copies.

Commercial, advertising licensing pricing example rights managed - 1
Commercial, advertising licensing pricing example rights managed - 1
Commercial, advertising licensing pricing example rights managed

Images used for advertising cost a great deal more than editorial primarily because you are using the image to sell a product or service though more effective visual advertising, for increased profit, so it’s only fair that the image that is being used to make money should cost more to use. Editorial costs will always be lower because they are supporting written articles, rather than selling products for increased revenue.

As I mentioned in the last article, RM licensing allows the picture buyer to have a specific license tailored to the exact requirements of their needed usage, so they both the buyer and the photographer receive a fair deal.

The final cost of the image is totally dependent on final exposure. It wouldn’t be fair on either party if both had to pay the same amount for totally different usages.